Miss P January 2015

WELCOME TO MY NEW PAGE FOR 2015

Please don't hesitate to contact me via gmail- misspmountp@gmail.com

# maths Friday- Your homework 27.2.15 ( by next Friday) is to complete this ALFIE test online - click this to go to the test

19.1.15

This week we are learning about division strategies and will also be completing another reasoning activity.OTHER WORDS/PHRASES FOR DIVIDE ARE- SHARE EQUALLY, SPLIT, HOW MANY TIMES DOES.... GO INTO.

Division can be a tricky area of maths so we will cover many ways that you can divide, strating with the chunking method.

THE CHUNKING METHOD

This method uses the times tables to help us to divide. The sum can be written using a numberline or can be written in a column.

 

 

*REMEMBER THAT DIVISION IS THE OPPOSITE OF MULTIPLICATION*

These are symbols for division:

 

This picture below, shows you how to divide using a numberline. When we do this in class, we follow these few simple steps;

1. We make an approximation of the answer. This helps us to estimate a reasonable answer and also to help us check. e.g. 234 / 6 = ? we could round this to 235 /5- as this is much easier to calculate

2. We then draw a numberline and label it 0________________________________________________234

3. Now, we are going to jump in in steps of 6 until we reach 234. This will tell us how many lots of 6 will fit into 234. We write the jumps as  10 X 6 and underline what we are multiplying the 6 by. Keep doing this until you get as close to the number at the end as possible.

4. FInally, we then add up how many jumps we have done ( adding all of the underlined numbers) and this will tell you how many times 6 has gone into the number. You may have some left over, which is your remainder.

See this picture below to help you and click for a video to talk you through this method =]

W/B 26.2.14 & 2.2.14

WE ARE NOW LOOKING AT AREA AND PERIMETER!!

THERE ARE TWO BASIC FORMULAE ( RULES YOU FOLLOW IN MATHS) FOR AREA AND PERIMETER. READ ON TO FIND OUT MORE .........

Perimeter is the toal distance around the outside of a shape. Just remeber a fence around a garden or the skirting board around a room. E.G a rectangular  field measured 30 m by 20m. To find the perimeter we add all the sides together so 30 + 30 + 20 + 20 = 100m THE RULE IS LENGTH + BREADTH X 2 ( FOR A 4 SIDED SHAPE ONLY)

*CLICK THE TWO PICTURES TO LISTEN TO A SONG ABOUT PERIMETER AND AREA*

Area is the surface inside the shape. Just remeber a garden lawn or a carpet in a room. To work out the area we have to multiply the length by the breadth ( L X B ). BECAUSE WE ARE MULTIPLYING THE TWO SIDE OF A SHAPE WE WRITE THE ANSWER USING THE SQUARED SYMBOL- THE LITTLE 2

E.g the are of the field mentioned above would be 30m x 20m = 600m2

Click here to listen to another song about area      

If you still need some help with area and perimeter, please click the picture to find out more=]

Finding the area and perimeter of a COMPOUND SHAPE is very similar. A COMPOUND SHAPE IS JUST TWO SEPERATE SHAPES JOINED TOGETHER- THEY ARE NORMALLY A COMINATION OF SQUARES AND RECTANGLES OR TWO RECTANGLES- SEE BELOW...........

To find the perimeter of this shape we just add up all of the sides. Sometimes we need to do a bit of detective work to find out the missing sides. There are two missing sides here, so we need to use the measurements we have to find them. The bottom side is the same lenth as the top ( going staright across) and we know that the whole top length is made up of 3 x 4cm = 12 cm so this is the length of the bottome side. The left side is also missing, however this is the same as the right side 8cm so we can say that the left side is also 8 cm. So.... lets add them all up for the perimeter

8 + 8 + 12 + 4 + 4+ 4+ 4 + 4 = 52 cm

Now, for the area. This can be alittle bit trickier so hang tight! We can split our shape up to work out the area- this makes it much easier. We could draw a line separating the tow top squares from the bottom rectangle like this.......

Then we could label them A, B , C or even 1,2,3. For this example we will label THE TOP LEFT A, THE TOP RIGHT B and the BOTTOM C.

So.....

A = L X B = 4 CM X 4 CM = 16 CM 2

B = L X B = 4CM X 4 CM = 16 CM 2

C = L X B = 12CM X 4 CM ( because half of 8 cm is 4 cm )= 48CM 2

To find the total of the shape as a whole, we just add the areas of A,B,C together = 16cm2 + 16cm2 + 48cm2 =  80 cm2

So there we have it, everything you will need to know about area and perimeter in year 6 =]

w/b 9.2.15

           WE ARE HAVING A WEEK OF SHAPE AND MEASUREMENT!

On Friday 6th, we leant about 3D shapes and how they are different to 2D shapes. 3D shapes have faces, edges and vertices. These are explained below.

Faces = these are the sides of the face. They can show you what 2D shapes make up the 3D shape

Edge = these are where two faces meet

Vertex or Verticies (if you have more than one) = where 3 or more edges meet and form a point

We have completed a shape investigation looking at the properties of different 3D shapes. We have learnt the names of some shapes in the picture below, including some more unusual 3D shapes such as an octohedron. Click the picture below to listen to a song about 3D shapes.

The picture below explains 3d properties of shapes. Click the picture to watch a tutorial and have a go at a 3D shape quiz!

W/B 23.2.15 AND PREVIOUS WEEK

We are now looking at length, measuring, converting, reading scales and mass. We have kicked off our topic with measuring length and width and using mm, cm and m. See the list below for all of the measurment abbreviations that we use today. We now work using the metric system of measurement ( I always remember m for metric m for modern) compared to the imperial system of measurement e.g inches, feet etc.

milimetre= mm

centimetre = cm

metre= m

kilometre= km

grams= g

kilograms= kg

mililitres= ml

litres = l

We found out that you can estimate the sizes of different objects by learning what each measurement 'looks like'. We had to estimate the length of various objects, select a suitable size measurement and then also select the appropriate apparatus. We found out that we can measure using:

* a ruler - this is useful for measuring smaller objects ( cm)

* a metre stick or wheel- these are useful for measuring larger distances in m e.g the school hall.

* a tape measure - this is useful for measuring large spaces, such as gardens and also curved objects such as a waist ( in cm or m)

* opisometer used to measure very long distances (km) such as driving across to Scotland

We have been measuring in cm and mm. We have learnt that there are 10mm in 1 cm and 100cm in 1m and 1000m in 1 km. Ella also pointed out that there are 1000mm in 1m. See the table below for the conversions.

* CLICK THE PICTURE TO LET THE MONDISO GANG EXPLAIN*

We can then use this to help us convert mm to cm , cm to m and so forth.

e.g we measure a person in the class and they are 110cm tall, because we know that there are 100 cm in 1 m we could say that the person is 1m and 10 cm or 1.1m ( divide by 100)

e.g we measure the page in our maths book, it is 300mm, because we know that there are 10 mm = 1cm we can say that the page is 30 cm wide ( because 300/10=30)

e.g we measure the computer screen width in cm and it measures 65cm, we need to write this as mm. We know that 10 mm= 1cm so we need to x 65 x 10 = 650 mm

THE RULE IS:

CONVERTING FROM BIG- SMALL = MULTIPLY

CONVERTING FROM SMALL - BIG = DIVIDE

We will be measuring larger objects around the school using m this week.

* REMEMBER mm FOR SMALL OBJECTS, cm FOR LARGER OBJECTS (E.G COMPUTER) m FOR EVEN LARGER OBJECTS/DISTANCES AND km FOR MEASURING VERY LARGE OBJECTS AND DISTANCES*

MEASURING IS VERY RELEVANT TO REAL LIFE CLICK THE PICTURE TO FIND OUT HOW

w/b 2.3.15

This week we have carried on with measurement, however we looked at weight. We found out that we measure weight in miligrams, grams and kilograms. To measure lighter objects we can use a scales ( digital or manual) and for heavier objects we can use a heavier duty scales.

We found out that  1000g = 1kg so 500g = 1/2 kg and so forth.

We weighed many objects around the classroom ranging from 2g to 3 kg. We used digital scales and scales with a needle. The most reiable and accurate scales were the digital scales and we also made sure that the scales all read 0 before weighing.

When we discussed - 'If something is large it will always be heavy' we found out that this is not always true. Some example of large objects that are light are ; large balloons, foam, hollow containers, cardboard boxes. This is also the case with the opposite statement ' If something is small it will be light'. We talked about how certain metals can be extremely heavy.

Click below to find out more .....

w/b 9.3.15

This week we have been learning all about angles!!!

Please visit http://www.mathsisfun.com/angles.html for lots more information about angles!!!

An angle measure the amount of a turn e.g in a quarter of a turn there is 90' and in a full turn there is 360'. See the diagram below.!

We measure angles in degrees- but not degrees celcius ( that's temperature!)

There are many types of angles. Knowing these helps us when it comes to measuring an angles, as it allows us to help estimate the angle!

See the table bewlo for the different types of anlge and what they measure.

 

 

See the picture for more help-

TEST YOUR SKILLS ON ESTIMATING THE SIZE OF AN ANGLE BY CLICKING THE PICTURE BELOW!!

 

We measure angles with a protractor. This is how we do it ........

CLICK THE PROTRACTOR TO WATCH A VIDEO ON HOW TO USE ONE PROPERLY!

We line the bottom line of the protractor up with the bottom line of the angle. You then need to line up the middle of the portractor ( the cross) with the pont of the angle. We can then look at the angle and decide whether we will use the outside or inside scale. This is when knowing your angles really helps! When you have decided on the scale, you can then can move up the scale to where the other line of the agle lies. Read this off the scale and you have measured your angle. This works for drawing angles too.You just draw in the bottom line , then measure how large/small your angle will be, mark the point and then draw the two perperndicular lines together- you have an angle!

 w/b 16.3.15

Sorry this has not been updated for a little while, we have been rather busy bees!

We have been learning about time and have been doing a lot of work on problem solving. We have also been looking at finding the difference between two amounts, temperatures or times by using a numberline.

Firsty, we will look at the 12hr, 24hr, digital and anlogue times. The 12hr clock uses the am and pm notation to tell us what the hour and minutes of the day/night it is. We use am for the morning up until 12.00 midday or noon  and then we use pm through to 12.00am (midnight). The 24hr clock is different becuase there is no am/pm. Instead the 24hr clock uses numbers 1-24 to tell whether it is night or day. The clok begins with 00.00- midnight and then moves around 01.00 all the way to middday - 12.00. After midday, the time then carries on so 13.00 at 1pm, 14.00 at 2pm and so forth.

The 24hr clock is often used in bus timetables, so it is important that we can read them. See the bus timetable below. There are no am/pm, but we can tell that these times are in the morning because it doesn't go past 12.00 and times are written 0.700.

Please see the clock below:

Sometimes, we have to find out how long a journey takes. This can easily be done by using a number line to jump from the starting time to the arrival time. It looks a bit like this, however this example is using whole numbers. This method can be used for finding the difference between any two amounts, inlcuding money and temperatures.

*JUST REMEMBER*

60 SECONDS IN ONE MINUTE

60 MINUTES IN ONE HOUR

24 HOURS IN ONE DAY

THAST HOW WE RAP TIME THE COOL KIDS WAY!

 

As the Angle Increases, the Name Changes:

Type of AngleDescription
Acute Angle an angle that is less than 90°
Right Angle an angle that is 90° exactly
Obtuse Angle an angle that is greater than 90° but
less than 180°
Straight Angle an angle that is 180° exactly
Reflex Angle an angle that is greater than 180°